14 Apples 2018

Wang Shin-hong is suffering from insomnia. A fortune teller advises the Mandalay businessman, whose car and bulging wallet suggest that business is going pretty well, to spend 14 days in a monastery, living life as a monk and eating an apple a day. Such a thing is possible in Burma today. Wang Shin-hong arrives at the rural monastery, has his head shaved and dons a red robe, in which he instantly becomes an authority. During the welcome procession, the village women, their poverty clear from their clothing and the huts in the background, put more than they have in his alms bowl. During his fleeting role as their advisor, Wang Shin-hong soon learns of the villagers’ attempts to survive and make a living as legal or illegal migrants in China, Thailand or Malaysia. He also finds out how the other monks try to generate profit and additional income.

Apple Tree Yard 2017

What starts out as a simple, reckless mid-life affair between a genetic scientist named Yvonne and a Westminster paper pusher takes an intriguing turn when she realizes he’s a spook – then suddenly gets very dark indeed. A provocative study of obsession, longing and just how far down a criminal path desire can take you.

Newton's Apple 1983

Newton's Apple is an American educational television program produced and developed by KTCA, and distributed to PBS stations in the United States that ran from 1983 to 1999. The show's title is based on the rumor of Isaac Newton sitting under a tree and an apple falling near him—or, more popularly, on his head—prompting him to ponder what makes things fall, leading to the development of his theory of gravitation. The show was produced by Twin Cities Public Television. For most of the run, the show's theme song was Ruckzuck by Kraftwerk, later remixed by Absolute Music. Later episodes of the show featured an original song. NPR science correspondent Ira Flatow was the show's first host, later succeeded by David Heil, then assistant director of the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry. Peggy Knapp was a longtime field reporter and served as co-host in the 14th season. The last season was hosted by the team of David Heil, Dave Huddleston, Actress and Voiceover artist, Eileen Galindo, Brian Hackney and SuChin Pak, now a frequent host and pop culture reporter for MTV. An occasional short feature appeared called "Science of the Rich and Famous" in which celebrities appeared to explain a science principle; as examples, rock star Ted Nugent explained guitar feedback, Olympic Gold Medalist skater Scott Hamilton demonstrated the angular momentum of a skater's spin, Let's Make a Deal host Monty Hall demonstrated the science of probability, and Betty White showed how cats purr.

Apple Pie 1978

Apple Pie is an American television sitcom that was broadcast on the ABC network from September 23, 1978 until September 30, 1978. It is based on the play Nourish the Beast, by Steve Tesich, who won the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay for 1979's Breaking Away. Apple Pie starred Rue McClanahan as lonely hairdresser Ginger-Nell Hollyhock, who lives in Kansas City, Missouri during the Depression year of 1933. "You can't pick your own relatives," goes the old saying, but that is exactly what Ginger-Nell does. Placing classified ads in the local newspapers, she recruits a con-man husband, "Fast Eddie" Murtaugh, played by Dabney Coleman; a tap-dancing daughter, Anna Marie Hollyhock, played by Caitlin O'Heaney; a son who wanted to fly like a bird, Junior Hollyhock, played by Derrel Maury; and a tottering old grandfather, Grandpa Hollyhock, played by Jack Gilford; all of whom come to live together—for the laughs. When the TV sitcom Maude ended in early 1978, producer Norman Lear created Apple Pie as a vehicle for Rue McClanahan, who had played Vivian Cavender Harmon on Maude. The show, however, was not well received and was canceled after only two episodes, though eight had been filmed under the direction of Peter Bonerz.

Apple's Way 1974

Apple's Way is a television dramedy which aired on CBS from 1974-1975. It was created by Earl Hamner, Jr..

Big Apple 2001

Big Apple is an American television drama series that was originally broadcast in the United States on CBS in 2001. The story centers on two New York City Police Department detectives Mooney and Trout working with the FBI to solve a murder with ties to organized crime. A subplot involves Mooney's sister who is receiving hospice care for Lou Gehrig's Disease. Big Apple was originally slated to compete with NBC's very popular medical drama series ER. Although 13 episodes were commissioned, only 8 aired before CBS canceled the show and replaced it with the newsmagazine 48 Hours in the 10pm Thursday time slot. In 2008, the series aired in syndication on Universal HD.

Appleseed XIII 2011

Appleseed XIII is a 2011 Japanese CGI anime adaptation of Masamune Shirow's science fiction manga series Appleseed. Composed of 13 episodes, the series retold the exploits of ES.W.A.T. member Deunan and her cyborg partner Briareos. The series was produced by Jinni's Animation Studios in association with Production I.G and under the direction of Takayuki Hamana with Junichi Fujisaku as script supervisor. All 13 episodes were compiled into two feature-length films. The first feature film titled Appleseed XIII: Tartaros was announced by Shochiku and released on June 13, 2011. The second film, Appleseed XIII: Ouranos was released on October 24, 2011. A North American release of the TV series will be out in June 2013.

Golden Apple 2005

Golden Apple is a South Korean television series starring Park Sol-mi, Kim Ji-hoon, Ji Hyun-woo, Go Eun-ah and Jung Chan. It aired on KBS2 from November 16, 2005 to February 23, 2006 on Wednesdays and Thursdays at 21:55 for 30 episodes. The story about four siblings living in a village in the 1960s, and a woman fighting to clear her dead father's name after he is wrongly accused of her stepmother's murder. Golden Apple received average viewership ratings of 17.43%, making it the 13th highest-rated Korean drama in 2006.

Apple Tree House 2017

An ordinary boy moves on to an extraordinary inner city estate, where he and his best friend solve daily problems and overcome childhood dilemmas.

Apple & Onion

Set in a world populated by anthropomorphic food, Apple and Onion, a pair of childlike newcomers to the big city, attempt to fit in to their new surroundings.

Ashita no Nadja 2003

Ashita no Nadja, is a romance anime with 50 episodes of 24 minutes installments, produced by Toei Animation and aired between February 2, 2003 and January 25, 2004. And it was the first TV Asahi Anime in the Sunday Morning 8:30 Timeslot to use TV Asahi's current logo. The opening theme is "Nadja!!" by Minako Honda, and the ending theme is "Que Sera, Sera" by Ami Koshimizu. The series is available on DVD containing two to three episodes each. The series has been released in French-Canadian R1 DVD by Imavision in two boxsets, and will receive English-language compilation dubbed movies from William Winckler Productions and Toei with a planned DVD release. In 2009, William Winckler Productions produced two all new English dubbed movie versions edited from the original series. Producer William Winckler, known for Tekkaman the Space Knight, wrote, produced and directed the English films, which are seen on broadband in Japan. A manga version, written by Izumi Todo and drawn by Yui Ayumi, was serialized by Kodansha in the manga magazine Nakayoshi from March 2003 to February 2004, and collected in two bound volumes.

The Appleyards

The Appleyards was a British television soap opera for children, made and transmitted fortnightly by BBC Television from 1952 to 1957, from the BBC's Lime Grove Studios. Transmitted live on a Thursday afternoon from 4:30 to 5 pm with a Sunday repeat, the programme told the story of the Home Counties family Mr and Mrs Appleyard and their four children. A reunion programme, "Christmas with the Appleyards", went out at Christmas 1960.

The Candy Apple News Company

The Candy Apple News Company was a locally produced children's television series that aired in the 1970s and 1980s on WCAU-TV, Channel 10 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In the show, a small human cast interacted with puppets in a radio and newspaper office. The principal human cast member was Matt Robinson, who had previously played Gordon on Sesame Street. Each episode was a half-hour of skits, short educational films, and other produced pieces.